The Girl with All the Gifts

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24/09/16

The Girl with All the Gifts is a  zombie movie with a difference: we see events unfold from Melanie (Senna Nanua)’s point of view – and Melanie is a ‘hungry.’

Hungries are second-generation zombies and they seem different from the depraved creatures first infected by the virus. They can speak and they can learn – and, if Dr Caldwell (Glenn Close) is right, they can be used to develop an antidote that will save the human race. And this is where the tension lies: do we agree with Miss Justineau (Gemma Arterton), the teacher and psychologist, who says they’re children? Or do we side with Sgt. Parks (Eddie Considine), who believes they’re monsters?

We’re on Justineau’s side, of course; how can it be otherwise in the face of Melanie’s nature? Sure, she’s hungry for blood, and she might find it hard to curb her appetite, but she’s sweet and clever and vulnerable – and capable of love.

This is a fascinating film, ably directed by Colm McCarthy, a perfect allegory for regime change and its moral complexities. The dystopia is beautifully rendered: a complete vision of a ravaged London, with a dwindling number of safe places, a doomed effort to survive against the odds. The acting is uniformly impressive, and young Nanua shines among this seasoned cast; she’s certainly one to watch.

Okay, so there are a few plot holes: how can Justineau get food without breaking the airlock, for example? And how did that dog manage to stay alive for so long? The scenes where the first-generation zombies give chase all feel a little over-familiar for a film that’s this original. But overall it’s a resounding success and I highly recommend you watch it.

4.6 stars

Susan Singfield

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